Erotic Review Magazine

The Semantics of Sexuality

by Karin Jones / 13th August 2018

When considering the relationship choices we now tolerate in the 21st century - homosexuality, bisexuality and trans-gendered identities - it’s clear that love comes in as many different varieties as spaghetti sauce; we just need to become more familiar with their unique ingredients.

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“Never fuck anyone you wouldn’t want to be. ” - Kate Bornstein

Love & Sex

Let's Get Over Our Genitals, Shall We?

by Karin Jones / 13th July 2018

The other day in my Twitter feed there was news that Missouri researcher Alicia Walker, PhD was calling for men to send her photos of their penises. Sadly, a few days later, she shut down the study because of public backlash and hate mail. Sigh... Only in America would this topic cause indignation.

Sex, Lies, and Laying Blame

by Karin Jones / 25th June 2018

Interviewing a liar might be the most fruitless thing I’ve ever done, so I don’t quite know how accurate data regarding deception is, since my liar was as charmingly cagey about his lying as he had been about his previous ‘truths’.

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Reviews

Tubing

by Celeste Pan / 31st July 2018

Someone I knew in New Zealand once described their impression of the London tube system: ‘The stops all have ridiculous names—Bank, Monument, Piccadilly Circus. It’s like a bloody video game.’ In K.A. McKeagney’s Tubing gaming is no longer an illusion, though nothing as innocuous as a video game either.

Embarrassing Sexual Misadventures

by Henry Coburn / 17th July 2018

If you’re ever stuck for conversation at an uninteresting dinner party and find yourself in desperate need of a supertanker-sized icebreaker, Embarrassing Sexual Misadventures: 1001 of the Most Tragically Hilarious Sexploits Ever might just be the perfect source material.

ER Summer Reads: The Queen of Bloody Everything

by Celeste Pan / 10th July 2018

An author’s transition from children’s books to adult fiction cannot but arouse the suspicion that outgrowing a genre requires time. In other words, the initial attempts are almost inevitably hybrids, haunted by traces of fairy tales, toy monkeys and misplaced innocence. Joanna Nadin’s The Queen of Bloody Everything offers, if not a refutation, then a formidable self-justification which uses the accusation to her own advantage.

ER summer reads: Cruising to Murder

by John D. Michaelis / 4th July 2018

Samuel Johnson once wrote “No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned.” I have to say that I’m rather with the good Doctor on that one: the concept of high life on the ocean wave may be a fine one, but when it comes to the realities of modern cruise ships, I’d rather be an armchair sailor.

Obsession

by Celeste Pan / 28th June 2018

Remembered chiefly for his time as editor of the avant-garde monthly publication The Dial in the 1920s when modernism was at its apogee, Scofield Thayer remained an elusive and essentially self-contradictory figure for literary and art historians. The American poet, publisher, philanthropist and aesthete has been described as a ‘Jekyll-and-Hyde paradox’, with his socialist leanings set against a bourgeois lifestyle, his unmistakable misogyny placed in blatant antithesis with a tenderly romanticist spirit. Perhaps no work has shed such an unique light on Thayer the private man than Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection, a selective catalogue as well as an illuminated biographical study on the collector and the artists alike.

Mothers

by Henry Coburn / 27th June 2018

Mothers represents more than a balling-up of shorter pieces, and is both tonally very even and thematically consistent. Many of the stories within concern characters at various stages in life who find themselves abroad, as well as caught in moments of personal transition. It is probably appropriate, considering the format of the short story and its necessary brevity, that Power explores ideas around transience, caprice and the unknowability of human emotions, as nearly every story in the collection does. It is not that Mothers has an inappropriate focus, but rather the format itself that is generally dissatisfying.

OK, Mr Field

by Henry Coburn / 10th June 2018

Ok, Mr Field is Faber’s Lead Debut for 2018 and, in both its publication in June and serialisation in The Paris Review, it represents the emergence of what we might call Faber’s Lead Debutante – young author Katherine Kilalea. While Kilalea has had a poetry collection published in 2009 and has received preliminary attention from the Southbank Centre and the mainstream press for her writing, all eyes are very much upon the young South African with this slim but promising first novel. If it were the Gala Ball, she would be preparing to make her grand entrance down the staircase in all pomp and circumstance. You can practically hear the creak of necks being craned.

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Articles

Sacred Sex

by Alison Banville / 10th August 2018

My life at the moment can be summed up alliteratively by two words - fasting and fucking. Honestly, the health kick trend of not eating seems to ignite the root chakra or something. All that energy normally spent on digesting food has to go somewhere. The result is a paradoxical union of the transcendent and the profane.

Rethinking Héloïse and Abélard

by Celeste Pan / 19th July 2018

More often than not, the story of Héloïse and Abélard is hurled onto the same stockpile of ‘star-crossed lovers’ to which Juliet, Troilus, Mélisande and Pyramus belong. Admittedly it has all the conventional elements of a tragic romance: a philosopher and his student fall in love; the girl’s uncle opposes; they marry in secret; the girl bears a child; the philosopher is brutally castrated; faced with no other option they both enter religious orders, while exchanging passionate letters to the end of their lives. A heady mix of piety and illicit desire, guilt and fury, it appears good enough, if not too good, for stage and screen.

Real, Cosmopolitan Men

by Alison Banville / 20th June 2018

Flicking through a copy of Cosmopolitan at my local railway station - I would never buy it, it's only for tutting at disapprovingly as I wait for trains - I saw they had interviewed some ‘real men’ about something to do with sex. I involuntarily rolled my eyes (and tutted disapprovingly) because I've noted that 'real men', according to Cosmo, are to be found not down mines or on construction sites but exclusively in professions that would never require them to break a sweat or develop calluses. They're always in poncey occupations such as wine importing or commodities trading, exactly the kinds of places, in fact, where I am likely to find that species of smug, preening, self-congratulating male I would never dream of having sex with. Men with a manicure probably, Lord save us. A buffed fingernail near my clitoris? I think not.

Thirteen Facts About Victorian Abortion

by Laura Ward / 13th June 2018

In the wake of the historic Irish Referendum, Laura Ward looks back through past societies at the almost unbelievable obstacles facing women in the UK who sought terminations and the bizarre underground culture that rose around them. Abortion was the only medical procedure to be banned by law Far more brutal surgeries, such as lobotomy or clitorectomy, were performed at whim. After the country's separation from the UK (concluded in 1921), Ireland’s eighth amendment had made abortion illegal since 1983, even in the cases of rape, incest and severe danger to the mother. Abortion law still remains unchanged in Northern Ireland.

LITHUANIA: AN UNLIKELY GOURMET DESTINATION

by Ali May / 28th March 2018

If I told you this would be the last drink of my life, what would you make me? I ask as I sit at the bar stool, beside a towering, bespectacled young bartender. A Negroni, because it is bittersweet, like life itself, he responds without hesitation, as if he gets such strange custom regularly. I have already shed my duvet of a coat, a silly hat with ear flaps, gloves and a scarf that is large enough to cover my entire body. It is a school night, which might explain why I am one of only three punters at Apoteka; the two others sit by the window that overlooks the Vilnius night, slightly muddled by confused snowflakes.

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Fiction

Larry's Laugh & Leather Thong

by Hannah Sward / 6th August 2018

Larry was kind of a bad guy. He had gotten in some trouble with the law when he was younger. I liked him. I met him when I was eighteen at Toronto Fashion Week. He was twenty-eight. I was on the security team and Larry was too.

Maggie Schuyler's Walk in the Woods

by Bruce Abrahams / 12th July 2018

It’s not all that wild up here in New Hampshire. Along with our adjacent states we share some rugged territory, but in truth are mostly pretty well settled. In winter the roads get cleared to enable the skiers to get here, which they do in numbers. That said, it is entirely possible for overly venturesome hikers to get lost and into trouble, which they predictably do.

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Galleries

Abigail Ekue: Men Behaving Nakedly

19th June 2017

Abigail Ekue’s Bare Men is showing for the first time outside of her native New York. We take a second look at her work. Why? Because we love it and we just can't get enough of it… Bare Men continues to challenge hegemonic notions of masculinity in a way that is both assertive yet nurturing, capturing the beauty of the male body but also the strength, playfulness, and tenderness of spirit. The result is at times touching, at others, highly erotic. It is always thought provoking.

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