Erotic Review Magazine

Female Viagra: an opinion

by Malachi O'Doherty / 28th August 2015

The FDA has recently approved a pill that claims to be a kind of Viagra for women

There is a clear difference between the chemical aids to sexual enjoyment offered to men and women.
Viagra is a physical aid. It acts on the body to reinforce the flaccid and the failing instrument of engagement. It is the equivalent of putting a sword in a fencer’s hand, equipping him for action on the understanding that he is already game for it.

Addyi, the drug just approved by the FDA for enabling women to be more sexually active, is psychotropic. It is about putting her into the mood. In that sense it is more like readying a fencer for the challenge by whispering in her ear. Which maps onto the standard stereotypes about male and female sexuality, the presumption that the man is up for it all the time, if only he can get it up, and the woman’s problem is mood or failing desire.

In a recent Radio Four production of Jeffrey Barnard Is Unwell, Barnard was quoted saying that he looked forward to impotence because his sexual desires had only ever got him into trouble. This reaffirms, or seems to, the notion that the phallus thinks for itself, has a mind of its own, drags a man into trouble like a frisky dog on a lead. Barnard thought that if his cock wasn’t twitching he would feel no sexual desire at all.

Those who compare the two drugs, and call Addyi the Female Viagra, make the same assumption. And there is some possible merit in the comparison.

Desire and the capacity to fulfil it are interwoven. A man who cannot rise to the expectations of a sexual partner is likely to be so disheartened that his interest will wane too. Give him a spanking hard erection and he may feel like a boy in a sports car, ready to ride rather further than he’d have gone on a wobbly bike. But his problem would not have been solved by working on him the other way round. A drug that lifted his ardour without propping up the flesh would only have made him feel worse about himself.

The presumption of the inventors of Addyi is that women work differently; with them, you can manage the spirit rather than the flesh and trust that the body can do its bit if the desire has been aroused. This comes close to the old prejudice that women don’t really have sexual organs in the same way that men do, that the vagina is a receptacle rather than another pulsing muscle like the one it has to take hold of if sex is to be good for both partners.

It’s as if fifty years of rethinking the clitoris had never happened.

Addyi recognises the problem from the man’s bleakest perspective of the woman. He knows how his own flesh fails him but he always sees her problems as mental. She has a headache; she’s not really in the mood. ‘Maybe tomorrow night, dear; it’s been a long day.’
Addyi proposes a solution to her dimmed interest that matches the solution to his weak cock, a drug.
Yet, doing that to a man, making him horny without a horn, would be cruel.
When perhaps if he took some responsibility for her mood himself and was patient and gentle and more attentive she might not need that drug.

I know a woman who claims that the chemical that acts best on her sexual interest is Domestos. Coming home to a man who has cleaned the bathroom is her biggest stimulus to arousal. For another it’s pizza and plonk.

When did men lose so much acquaintance with women that they forgot that, when detachment and a preference for sleep are the problem, it doesn’t mean she needs medication?
Flowers, for fuck’s sake!

Indeed, if she then warmed to him, for the sweet natured and affectionate chap that he had become, instead of prompting her to take her pill, she might tweak a reflex or two in him, and he mightn’t need his drug either.

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The FDA has recently approved a pill that claims to be a kind of Viagra for women

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